Science Gazette

By 2050, the United States’ shoreline might see a one-foot increase in sea level

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By 2050, the United States is predicted to have seen as much sea level rise as it had in the preceding hundred years. According to a study produced in collaboration with a half-dozen other US government agencies, NOAA is updating sea level rise decision-support information for the US.

By 2050, the United States is predicted to have seen as much sea level rise as it had in the preceding hundred years. According to a study produced in collaboration with a half-dozen other federal agencies, NOAA is updating sea level rise decision-support information for the United States.

Based on a combination of tide gauge and satellite observations, as well as all of the model ensembles from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Sixth Assessment Report, the Sea Level Rise Technical Report provides the most up-to-date sea level rise projections for all US states and territories by decade for the next 100 years and beyond (IPCC). According to the analysis, sea levels would increase a further 10-12 inches around the coast by 2050, with particular amounts varied regionally owing to land height changes.

The paper contains further information on tide, wind, and storm-driven extreme water levels impacting present and future coastal flood risk, as well as revisions to the federal government’s 2017 sea level rise forecasts. This data is used by a number of government tools, including the NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer, which are vital to the Administration’s commitment to address the climate crisis by providing actionable climate data to people who need it.

“Knowing what to anticipate and how to prepare for the future is crucial for companies along the coast,” said Gina M. Raimondo, US Secretary of Commerce. “These revised predictions will assist companies and the communities they serve in identifying risks and making wise investments in the coming years.”

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“This new data on sea level rise is the latest indication that our climate problem is flashing ‘code red,'” according to Gina McCarthy, National Climate Advisor. “We must step up our efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change while also assisting our coastal communities in becoming more robust to rising sea levels.”

“This is a worldwide wake-up call that provides Americans with the knowledge they need to act now to best prepare themselves for the future,” said NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad, Ph.D. “These updated statistics may enlighten coastal communities and others about present and future vulnerabilities in the face of climate change, and help them make informed choices to keep people and property safe in the long term as we work to establish a Climate Ready Nation.”

The analysis also shows that, even in the absence of storms or severe rainfall, the predicted sea level rise by 2050 would result in a significant increase in the frequency of coastal flooding.

“By 2050, moderate flooding, which is normally disruptive and harmful by today’s weather, sea level, and infrastructure standards,” said Nicole LeBoeuf, director of the NOAA National Ocean Service. “In some regions, these figures indicate a shift from a single occurrence every 2-5 years to many incidents per year.”

“This analysis backs up past research and proves what we’ve long suspected: sea levels are rising at an alarming pace, putting communities throughout the globe in jeopardy. The science is undeniable, and immediate action is essential to avert a looming climate calamity “NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said. “NASA is committed to safeguarding our home planet by enhancing our monitoring capabilities and ensuring that our climate data is not only available but also understood.”

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The Interagency Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flood Hazard and Tool Task Force, which includes NOAA, NASA, EPA, USGS, DoD, FEMA, and the US Army Corps of Engineers, as well as various academic institutions, produced this multi-agency endeavor. The paper draws on the 6th Assessment Report of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as well as supporting studies for the US Department of Defense’s Defense Regional Sea Level database.

Visit https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/hazards/sealevelrise/sealevelrise-tech-report.html to read the Sea Level Rise Technical Report.

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